TECHMILL INTERVIEW: CLARISSA REDWINE

by Alyssa Stevenson

By Danielle Longueville

Marshall Culpepper, Clarissa Redwine and a guy with a beard and teeth named Tyler Browder. 

Marshall Culpepper, Clarissa Redwine and a guy with a beard and teeth named Tyler Browder. 

TechMill, a Denton non-profit group assembled to help create and launch technology-related businesses in Denton, had an open house last night to roll out their collaborative workspace concept in collaboration with Square 205. We hung out and tried to have a conversation with some people but we aren't sure if Pascal is a computer language or a binary code so we just drank off the keg of Greenbelt, nodded and laughed when we thought it seemed appropriate. 010010111001, right? The following is an interview we had with one of TechMill's superstars (and all around cool person, Clarissa Redwine). Read on for more. 


WDDI: Tell us how TechMill started. 

Well, first there were doers.  About a year ago, the community had several tech startup advocates pop up and start putting on events,  looking for other like-minded folks.  The organizers of OpenHack, LittleDOCC, Startup Weekend, DentonJelly, and a few other initiatives started hanging out and soon decided we could do a lot more for the community as a collective.  And that’s what we are today, simply a collective of movers and shakers, all working on different initiatives, toward the ultimate goal of growing the Denton tech startup community.

Who are some prominent figures responsible for the creation and establishment of the organization?

Every single person on our Board of Directors has made a significant impact in the tech startup community in some way, and that’s precisely why we work together.  We have a shared vision.  Here’s our team: Daniel Abasolo, Tyler Browder, Marshall Culpepper, Patrick Peters, Clarissa Redwine, Dave Sims, & Kyle Taylor.

What’s the coolest thing to come out of TechMill so far?

The coolest thing to come out of TechMill is the critical mass of the community network. Depth of skill and collective fervor is magnified when brought together.  Now, when someone wants to build something or learn something, there’s a good chance they can find an intersection in the community that will provide the contacts and tools they need.  

How do you envision TechMill growing?

We subscribe to the bootstrap mentality where validation comes before growth.  So, we will continue to grow sustainably, only pushing forward after we’ve verified that the direction is supported by the larger community.  I guess, to put it simply, TechMill will grow as the community grows, in whatever direction that is.

Do you guys have any long term goals about involvement with the city?

We sure do!  We see the city taking big steps to support our tech startup scene.  We want to help them do it.  One major initiative we will announce at the open house event is the Open iBeacon Network. I have been pulling together the resources to make Denton the first open beacon enabled city in the world.  We’re starting with the Square and working outward, building a network of beacons that is open to developers and startups.  This will define Denton as a city for innovative tech startups working with the latest technology.  

Can anyone become a member of TechMill, or what’s the process like in how to get involved?

Absolutely. We look for community minded people who are interested in working in a social environment.  Tech startups can really benefit from the network.

Aside from this new coworking space you guys have opened up, where else can we find y’all?

Our original location at Banter is staying open as a free coworking space for the community. We’re also at Banter every other Tuesday from 8-9am for LittleDOCC, a chat about the latest in tech.  Every third Wednesday of the month we’re at Banter for OpenHack.  All tech startup community events- including events from the Innovation Greenhouse, UNT’s the Factory, and the library’s The Forge- can be found on the Startup Denton Tech Meetup Page. 

What’s your greatest memory so far on the journey to making this shared dream happen?

My favorite memory is of the very first meeting we had as a community.  About a year ago, I asked Kevin Roden if he could invite all the tech people he knew in Denton to his house so I could meet them.  It was super cold and late at night but about a dozen of us showed up, drank beer, and collaborated about building the denton tech startup community.  That was the first glimmer of what the denton tech scene could be- altruistic, dedicated, and ready to build.

Fun Fact: It was also super icy and our TechMill cofounder Kyle ended up totaling his car that night.  

So we know that as tried-and-true Dentonites, everyone has their favorite coffee spot. So tell us where your allegiance lies...

Haha- I think I have to say Banter- not because of the coffee- but because of the community.  Banter supports the maker culture of Denton brilliantly.  If anyone has a meetup and needs a space, they will hook you up!

Where can we find more information about TechMill and other coworking spaces? Have any good recommendations?

Clarissa: The best way to learn more about the Denton tech startup community is to come to an event.  All events are posted on the Startup Denton Tech meetup page.

Thanks Clarissa!

Citizen Spoltlight: Ms. Amy Taylor, Middle School Teacher

by Alyssa Stevenson

BY RACHEL SIMPSON, a Comp I student in DR. Ashley Bender's class as part of TWU Serves, a University Housing Living Learning Community.

amy taylor.jpg

We can probably all agree that middle school was the weirdest, most awkward time in our lives. Everyone’s body is changing, stinky boys get stinky-er, and mean girls get meaner. Our guess is most of us like to block out those years, but there’s one aspect that we have probably overlooked: our middle school teachers. Whether you remember them as annoying or hilarious, our middle school teachers had a lot of influence over us. I had the privilege to sit down with Amy Taylor, a really cool, laid back middle school teacher. According to Ms. Taylor, in her profession, "if you're willing to do the work, it's a pretty lovely job."


Ms. Taylor is a seventh grade English teacher at Calhoun Middle School, and she has her hands full. Her weekly routine is hectic: teaching three, hour and a half (two regular and one enhanced) classes daily, a department meeting every other day, and a planning period every other day. She stays late to tutor for a half hour and remains afterwards to grade and tweak lesson plans. “It’s the most work you’ll ever do. When I go home, I work,” Ms. Taylor said nonchalantly. But with a schedule like that, what on earth is so appealing about teaching, especially when the kids are obsessed with impressing their peers 24/7 rather than schoolwork. However, Ms. Taylor wouldn’t trade it for anything. “I believe in it too much,” she sincerely said. It takes a special person to look forward to working with tweens every day and knowing that a middle school teacher loves her job so much is inspiring.

When I asked her why middle school, she replied "it really chose me." Ms. Taylor used to work in the textbook publishing industry, but realized that she wanted to work with actual students. She was first hired by Denton Independent School District as a 4th grade teacher, but the following year began teaching English at CMS. She told me that she absolutely loves being with middle school children. “It’s a changing time for kids,” she smiled. She referred to sixth through eighth grade as an “important age.” And, as a matter of fact, Ms. Taylor doesn’t even use the textbook. Not only do her custom lesson plans from scratch cater to her kids specifically, it also keeps the students engaged in the class as well, which in turn keeps the behavior problems to a minimum.

mentor denton.jpg

As we all can guess, working in a middle school is probably really challenging, but Ms. Taylor wouldn’t trade her job for the world. Why? For her “it’s more than just a job.” She knows she is part of the front line in shaping a student’s world and is using her influence for the best. It’s hard to realize this at the time, but during these middle school years, kids are heavily influenced by their peers as well as their teachers. She understands that some of her students have a lot going on at home and realizes that sometimes English is not the most important thing in their lives. The fact that Ms. Taylor takes so much pride in her job and really cares about her students is really impactful. But, this ideal isn’t seen much nowadays. People are continually putting work ahead of more important matters. Maybe we should start to use Ms. Taylor’s mindset in our daily lives.  

Another mentality we can learn from Ms. Taylor is that bad days happen, and it’s okay. “It’s miserable the first year,” she told me when I asked about her experience in education. “You will have bad days, but kids are unpredictable.” Exchange kids for coworkers in that sentence and bam; you got yourself another set of advice to carry with you when you go to work. No one is an expert at anything on the first try. It’s cool to see that someone who is so influential over these kids understands this conept and helps kids grow up learning that when failure happens it is not the end of the world.

We are all influenced by our surroundings every day, whether it is our teachers, parents, peers, and/or mentors from programs like Mentor Denton. In middle school, we are more susceptible to influences do to the nature of tween behavior. Having Ms. Taylor as a teacher who is understanding, laid back, and adores her job influencing middle schoolers with her worldly views is a necessity. Not only can her philosophies be used inside a classroom, they can and should be applied in every career. Thank your teachers y’all, they’ve helped you more than you probably realize. 


THE DEN10: NOVEMBER 19

by Alyssa Stevenson

Who wants to drink from the firehose? The weather will be just like this until New Years Day. We promise, y'all. There are far too many great events to attend this week. Throw on top of that all of the holiday parties you're headed to and you’ll wish you lived in a place where nothing happened. The pictures we have to choose from What We Did on Monday have been incredible lately and we love to see 'em so keep 'em coming!

Questions or comments may be directed towards glen@wedentondoit.com


Wednesday, November 19th
Conspiracy Movie Screening | Willis Library Forum | 6:30PM
Mean Greens For Animals will be screening what sounds like the Loose Change documentary for people afraid of eating animals. Not quite Interstellar, but we’ll take it.

Catching the Vibe: Beatmakers Forum | Abbey Underground | 9PM
Producer gear-heads take note.

Thursday, November 20th
Beaujolais & More | Denton Civic Center | 5:30 | BUY TICKETS
Wine from Metzler’s and beer from Audacity Brewhouse plus door prizes will be happening at this year's event that will be benefiting our beloved Denton Community Theatre.

TechMill Open House | 210 S Elm St | 5PM
Looks like TechMill is moving into their co-working space and they want everyone to come check it out and christen the launch. Co-hosted by the smart folks at Square 205.

Students Research Showcase | Innovation Greenhouse UNT | 4PM 

Friday, November 21st
Say Hi / Fishboy / Delia Haunt | Rubber Gloves Rehearsal Studios | 9PM


SPONSOR: THE CHESTNUT TREE TEAHOUSE AND BISTRO

The Chestnut Tree is one of our favorite places in town to have lunch/brunch/any other thing that ends in "unch."


100,000 Homes Community Briefing | Civic Center | 12PM
This is a great initiative that our city is taking on to work to end homelessness. Watch the video to get an overview of this game-changing program.

3rd Friday Swing Out | Sprockets | 8PM 
DSDO is hosting their 3rd Friday Swing dance at our local bike and cupcake shop. Yes, you read that correctly and welcome to Denton, y'all.

Saturday, November 22nd
Good / Bad Art Collective Presents Rock Lottery 13 | Dan’s Silver Leaf | 9PM
This will sell out in advance so if you want to see it, get tickets ASAP.

Stellar Black IPA Release | Audacity Brew House | 6PM
Their Raptor IPA is delicious so we’re very excited about this  90 IBU IPA offering. 

PEOPLE OF DENTON: REBECA PERFECTO

by will milne

STORY BY NAOMI WOOD, PHOTOS BY WESLEY KIRK

Every once in a while, we like to interview a various folks in town that are of interest to us and probably you. They might be kinda weird, kinda funny, or just someone we ran into on the street. We take some photos, ask 'em some questions, and there you have it. It's People of Denton.

It isn’t every day that you meet someone so unassuming, yet so diversely talented. Rebeca Perfecto (yes that’s her real name) on a typical day, recruits undergraduate students to The University of North Texas. She spends most of her time traveling to the farthest reaches of South Texas, compelling potential students to jump on the Denton bandwagon. But this recruiter has secrets. Lots of them. Perfecto is a recruiter by day, but a Latin Pop Singer, Saxophonist, Author, Entrepreneur, and Activist by night. She’s also from our sister territory Puerto Rico, but now calls herself a Texas native since she moved back a year and a half ago. Perfecto is a UNT alum and an all around Denton lover-girl (let’s just call her a Denton recruiter). Maybe you’ve seen her at local shows or at East Side/Oak Street having a beer with co-workers or relatives. We snatched Perfecto on her lunch break and found out way more than we could have asked for.


 

How long have you been in Denton?

I’ve officially moved back to Denton from Puerto Rico almost two years ago. I spent the majority of the 2000s here as a student, and helping develop UNT’s LGBT Ally sensitivity training. The one gold nugget of a saying I tell prospective students and their parents are: “Denton is a bustling small town with a big heart.” Denton is so awesome because it feels small, but has an incredible music scene, and also the convenience of living 30 miles from a major city. It’s safe here and it feels good. I have met more interesting and diverse people in this city than any other. With only 150,000 residents, normally 50,000 of those people are students. I bring my Puerto Rican friends to Dallas and they’re like “meh, big city...” and then when I bring them to Denton they’re like “awww!”

 

Being a Latin Pop Singer, how did you get started in music and why did you choose pop as a genre to identify with?

A lot of people don’t give pop enough credit. I grew up listening and dancing to salsa music. I love pop so much because it can have interwoven instrumentation, and there is interesting depth. To me, pop isn’t just what you hear on the radio, it can be multi-layered. I was raised with Ricky Martin and Juan Luis Guerra. Since my album is in Spanish and I wrote it for people in my home country, I knew that it would resonate with them. I also studied in the jazz music program here at UNT, and it had a huge influence on the way I wrote and composed my music as an artist. I ended up graduating with a degree in sociology, but always found myself in the practice rooms in the music building working on my music.

 

Do you have a fan base in Puerto Rico?

I would say so, I mean we are just getting started really. I have the adult crowd that is drawn by the lyrics, and I also have the teenage crowd that loves the catchy music itself. It’s a good combination. It’s very hard for me to write in English because it’s not as poetic as Spanish. I think there are so many more metaphors in Spanish, and I want to write like Marques, Lorca, Neruda, and Julia de Burgos. These people had a huge influence on how I write my music.  My producer Josue Parilla is also a UNT alumni and we worked for four solid years on this album to get it perfected.

 

Let’s segue into your next passion, writing: You were an instrumental part in the Ally sensitivity training and development here at UNT. Do you consider yourself an LGBT activist?

I do, but honestly it’s on the back-burner right now. I’m a creative person, so my music takes up the majority of my personal time. I graduated with a degree in sociology, so I consider myself a person that stands up for those that are marginalized. Whether that be hispanic, low income, gay, lesbian, you name it. I think that the sensitivity training was something that I was working on at the time because it was super important to me, and was a necessary step that UNT was trying to take in that direction. I happened to be in the right place at the right time, and was able to work with some really important people like Dr. Emeneheiser, Sue Young, and Mary Finley. It was exciting having influence on the program development when it was in its infancy. It also led me down another path to start writing an instructional book about bullying.


Why did you decide to write an anti-bullying book in Spanish?

I wrote it in Spanish because there was literally no resources available for kids in spanish. I also wrote it not as an information piece for them, but as an interactive guide that the kids could write in, throw down when they were mad, and ultimately destroy if they wanted to. I wanted them to play with it, write in it, and use it however they needed it. Currently, it is sold out in Puerto Rico. We have a new order in the works.

SPONSOR: AUDACITY BREW HOUSE

SPONSOR: AUDACITY BREW HOUSE

 

Do you think it’s important to maintain creativity even with a full-time job?

Absolutely, although I think my job still allows for creativity. Since I am a UNT recruiter, my job is to come up with creative ways to compel students that UNT and Denton are a beautiful place. I am fortunate to be able to work with wonderful people, and sophisticated software to make that happen. I have free reign to make videos, flyers, brochures, etc.... I also travel most of the year in South Texas, which is pretty sweet. I love being on the go.

 

Since you’re multi-talented, where do you see yourself in five years?

I want to continue writing within my publishing contract. I want to keep producing whatever it is that I find next whether that be music or books. As long as I’m working on creative projects, I am very fulfilled. I could never not have something going on the side.

 

Besides writing, creating music, and recruiting for UNT, is there anything else that we don’t know about you?

My brother and I are dabbling in entrepreneurship and have started the Grand Prairie School of Music for children. These kids would not otherwise have access to music lessons at a low cost. Right now we have 110 students, and we only charge $13 per 30 minute session. Again, we think access is important and critical to students who may be at a disadvantage. We hope it really takes off and will be life changing for those kids. There’s so much research that shows the powerful impact that music has on student’s lives, we hope to keep this going and see it grow.


You can buy a copy of Perfecto’s book here, her website here, the Grand Prairie School of Music here, or UNT Ally Training here

This column as part of a new ongoing partnership with Wesley Kirk's People of Denton project. Check outPeopleofDenton.Tumblr.com for more.




WHAT WE DID: NOVEMBER 17TH 2014

by will milne

What We Did is our version of water cooler talk. We can talk about the weather, sports, that one episode of The Walking Dead or whatever else happened over the weekend. In addition to that, we like to share some of our favorite images tagged with #WDDI from the past seven days and caption some of 'em. 

Below is our Monday morning collection of photos from WDDI readers and contributors. If you'd like to have an image included, tag your photos with #WDDI on Instagram and we'll include our favorites next Monday. Click the photo to be led back to that photographer's Instagram account and make sure to follow them! There's lots of great Instagramers living in Denton. Have a great week!


Making coffee at Shift. 

Making coffee at Shift. 

Random corners in Denton make for great photo backdrops. 

Random corners in Denton make for great photo backdrops. 

Funny comment about the courthouse. 

Funny comment about the courthouse. 

We went to a reception put on by Keep Denton Beautiful last Wednesday and got to cheer for a lot of awesome people making our community a lot better looking. 

We went to a reception put on by Keep Denton Beautiful last Wednesday and got to cheer for a lot of awesome people making our community a lot better looking. 

West Oak Coffee Bar x Bell and Oak collaboration. We love it when awesome folks get together. 

West Oak Coffee Bar x Bell and Oak collaboration. We love it when awesome folks get together. 

Help-Portrait: Denton had their first meeting of the year last week. Wanna get involved? They're still in need of donations including food and photos paper. Follow them on their Facebook page. 

Help-Portrait: Denton had their first meeting of the year last week. Wanna get involved? They're still in need of donations including food and photos paper. Follow them on their Facebook page

More coffee pics. It must be cold or something outside. 

More coffee pics. It must be cold or something outside. 

Denton Paws for a Cause was on Saturday.   

Denton Paws for a Cause was on Saturday. 

 

Doug Burr playing The Shawl at St. David's. 

Doug Burr playing The Shawl at St. David's. 

Def Rain at Rubber Gloves. 

Def Rain at Rubber Gloves. 

Oh yeah, we got our first snow of the season last night. 

Oh yeah, we got our first snow of the season last night. 

Dr. Pepper and Topo Chico. 

Dr. Pepper and Topo Chico. 

We'll end with this shot of coffee and coffee cake from Shift. Treat yoself, y'all. 

We'll end with this shot of coffee and coffee cake from Shift. Treat yoself, y'all. 

BACK IN THE DAY: DENTON’S VETERANS DAY LEGACY

by Alyssa Stevenson

By Shaun Treat

Veteran’s Day seems a perfect opportunity to look back on the truly unique contributions and characters in Denton history as a salute to our family and friends in the U.S. Armed Services. Well, them and maybe more’n a few soldiers who actually took up arms against the USA, which gives us some food for thought on the nature of patriotism from back in the day.

A reunion of former soldiers from "Sul-Ross Camp" 129, taken in front of the Denton County Courthouse in 1902, including some well-known Denton names. Photo courtesy of the Denton Public Library.

A reunion of former soldiers from "Sul-Ross Camp" 129, taken in front of the Denton County Courthouse in 1902, including some well-known Denton names. Photo courtesy of the Denton Public Library.

Today, folks tend to throw around the word “patriotism” or “patriotic” as if it’s a natural God-given good thing, but this ain’t always been the case. The classical Greeks invoked patrios ("of one's fathers") or pater (genitive patros, "father"), note scholars Liddell & Scott, as derision "applied to barbarians who had only a common [patris], [politai] being used of Greeks who had a common [polis] (or free-state)." Connotations towards non-thinking knuckle-dragging nationalists endured into the mid 18th century as “a factious disturber of the government." Little wonder then, that cantankerous American revolutionaries took up the term as a banner of pride, and so it has endured. The City of Denton was barely 3 years old when the “War between the States” began, pitting an increasingly abolitionist United States against the South’s secessionist Confederacy. Denton narrowly supported secession by 75 votes in 1861 but, our representative James W. Throckmorton was one of only 7 to vote against it to the boos of the Austin gallery. Throckmorton is said to have loudly retorted: “Well may patriots tremble, when the rabble hiss!!” Although smallholding Dentonites complained it was “a rich man’s war but the poor man’s fight”, since most large Texas slaveholders outrageously earned conscriptions that exempted them from fighting in the Civil War, make no mistake that most of Denton’s loyal Texas sons volunteered to great personal cost. These old timers were so hard, y’all, a 72 year-old Denton County local straight-up walked to a Confederate Veterans Reunion in Macon GA, over 900 miles away!! It took ole J.C. Williams 65 days!

A 1914 group photo of World War I soldiers in front of the fire station on West Oak Street.

A 1914 group photo of World War I soldiers in front of the fire station on West Oak Street.

Many folks may not realize that Veteran’s Day was actually the 1938 rebranding of Armistice Day, the holiday commemorating the cessation of armed World War I hostilities between the Allies and Germany that went into effect on the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month in 1918. This end of the terrible “Great War” was celebrated “with solemn pride in the heroism of those who died in the country’s service” and “because of the opportunity it has given America to show her sympathy with peace and justice in the councils of the nations…" After the announcement of the end of WWI in 1919, Denton celebrations included the cancellation of schools and business, a parade around the downtown Square accompanied by campus bands, fireworks from the Denton Courthouse well into the night, and a few maniac soldiers riding a goshdurned TANK around the frackin’ Square!! Boy howdy, Denton has always loved excuses for a parade!

I’m betting this little motorized adventure led to a few new city ordinances.

I’m betting this little motorized adventure led to a few new city ordinances.

But hey now, we also promised stories of kickbutt heroes, right? Rest assured, Denton has plenty! Here, then, is my photoessay as a big THANK YOU to all those veterans who have served and are still keeping America safe with their courage and commitment! Take a free trip on the DCTA A-rain today, y’all deserve it!

This All-American badass is Col. Carl Storrie (maybe related to Bob Storrie of Travelstead?) in front of his B-29 Superfortress "The City of Denton," possibly of the 314th Bombardment Wing , 20th Air Force during WWII. Photo and backstory sleuthing by Mike Cochran.

This All-American badass is Col. Carl Storrie (maybe related to Bob Storrie of Travelstead?) in front of his B-29 Superfortress "The City of Denton," possibly of the 314th Bombardment Wing , 20th Air Force during WWII. Photo and backstory sleuthing by Mike Cochran.

General K.L. Berry, born and raised in Denton TX, was a UT athlete and survived the infamous Bataan Death March, spending the remainder of the war (forty months) as a prisoner of war to then become a highly decorated veteran and honoree of the Texas Military Force Museum.

General K.L. Berry, born and raised in Denton TX, was a UT athlete and survived the infamous Bataan Death March, spending the remainder of the war (forty months) as a prisoner of war to then become a highly decorated veteran and honoree of the Texas Military Force Museum.

Members of the Women Air Force Service Pilots: from left Frances Green, Margaret Kirchner, Ann Currier and Blanche Bross walk in front of a B-17 plane called a “Pistol Packin’ Mama” after training at Lockbourne AAB in Columbus, Ohio. Photo courtesy of the TWU archives and the Denton Record Chronicle.

Members of the Women Air Force Service Pilots: from left Frances Green, Margaret Kirchner, Ann Currier and Blanche Bross walk in front of a B-17 plane called a “Pistol Packin’ Mama” after training at Lockbourne AAB in Columbus, Ohio. Photo courtesy of the TWU archives and the Denton Record Chronicle.

 

Shaun Treat is founder of the Denton Haunts historical ghost tour. Treat has written about numerous local places and personalities at his Denton Haunts blog, and is forever indebted to the great work of the fine folks with the Denton County Department of History & Culture as well as our local keepers of history like Mike Cochran and Laura Douglas at the Emily Fowler Library for their tireless work in helping preserve Denton’s intriguing past.

WHAT WE DID: NOVEMBER 10TH 2014

by will milne

Hot damn that was a beautiful weekend. 

What We Did is our version of the water cooler talk. We can talk about the weather or sports or whatever else happened over the weekend. So...howsabout that nice tease of fall weather on Sunday, y'all? Pretty nice huh? Plus that Mean Green win, too? Not a bad weekend at all if you ask us. 

Below is our Monday morning collection of photos from WDDI readers and contributors over the past seven days. If you'd like to have an image included, tag your photos with #WDDI on Instagram and we'll include our favorites next Monday. Click the photo to be led back to that photographer's Instagram account so you can follow them and stuff. Have a great week!

Leading lines and train tracks.

Leading lines and train tracks.

Saturday was UNT's homecoming game. They won and we got a parade. Not necessarily in that order, though. 

Saturday was UNT's homecoming game. They won and we got a parade. Not necessarily in that order, though. 

This is either the first hand view of a parade or something bad is about to happen. 

This is either the first hand view of a parade or something bad is about to happen. 

Friday night's pre-homecoming game bonfire. 

Friday night's pre-homecoming game bonfire. 

Shiloh Field is expecting a 28,000 lb harvest this year. Ian Harber was there to help. 

Shiloh Field is expecting a 28,000 lb harvest this year. Ian Harber was there to help. 

November was going strong at this month's First Friday event. 

November was going strong at this month's First Friday event. 

Breaking Bad triptych from Hypnotic donuts. We doubt he took just the one bite. 

Breaking Bad triptych from Hypnotic donuts. We doubt he took just the one bite. 

What section is this in? 

What section is this in? 

Y'all ever noticed what must be the worst Texas in Denton? I mean, they've got west Texas, pretty okay, but something bad must have happened to this person in South and East Texas. I mean...are y'all okay?

Y'all ever noticed what must be the worst Texas in Denton? I mean, they've got west Texas, pretty okay, but something bad must have happened to this person in South and East Texas. I mean...are y'all okay?

Shift has new, fun brewing devices and bay leaf-flavored syrups. 

Shift has new, fun brewing devices and bay leaf-flavored syrups. 

You know things are going well when your bottle of wine has about as much volume as your Christmas tree. Also, is it Christmas already?

You know things are going well when your bottle of wine has about as much volume as your Christmas tree. Also, is it Christmas already?

One of our favorite local-area photogs, Melissa Laree, was around town shooting for I Love Texas Photo last week. She got to hang out with a few of our favorite Dentonites including Armand Kohandani of Denton Camera Exchange above. Denton Camera Exchange has quickly become one of our favorite places in town to stop by and grab a fun piece of vintage camera equipment or film. Armand, wanna give us a discount on fixing up that Polaroid Land camera? Huh? 

One of our favorite local-area photogs, Melissa Laree, was around town shooting for I Love Texas Photo last week. She got to hang out with a few of our favorite Dentonites including Armand Kohandani of Denton Camera Exchange above. Denton Camera Exchange has quickly become one of our favorite places in town to stop by and grab a fun piece of vintage camera equipment or film. Armand, wanna give us a discount on fixing up that Polaroid Land camera? Huh? 

Last week was also the 75th anniversary of the Little Chapel in the Woods. 

Last week was also the 75th anniversary of the Little Chapel in the Woods. 

Oh yeah and that whole election thing happened. Y'all know about all that stuff, right? 

Oh yeah and that whole election thing happened. Y'all know about all that stuff, right? 

Raised Right Men has quickly become one of our favorite live acts to catch in town. 

Raised Right Men has quickly become one of our favorite live acts to catch in town. 

Hannah Gamble has one of our favorite Instagram handles (@itshannahgambleyall) and one of our favorite breakfasts here. Jealous. 

Hannah Gamble has one of our favorite Instagram handles (@itshannahgambleyall) and one of our favorite breakfasts here. Jealous. 

FRIDAY VIDEO THREESOME: NOVEMBER 2014

by will milne

It's time for another Friday Video Threesome post in which we highlight three videos that involve Denton in some way, shape, or form. Today, we have a great video on Denton Coffee Culture created by a 16 year old, a video of Nite's performance at last month's SoFar Sounds show, and a fun GoPro video from Little Guys Movers showcasing what it's like to race a coffin down Oak St. Now let's watch some videos!


Here's a video about the coffee scene in Denton county from 16 year old Austin Leih. While Bookish is featured heavily, this is a video that focuses more on Denton County than the City of Denton so the other coffee shops we see are Trio in Flower Mound (which has fun Belgian waffle thingies, y'all) and Roots in Highland Village. 

Nite at last month's SoFar Sounds show. You can read more about that show from our post here

Here's a fun video with a first-hand account of what it is like to go down Oak St. in a coffin from Little Guys Movers. Now we kinda wanna build our own coffin next October.